Why I Don’t Use Facebook: Part 3

This is part three in a series which details why I think you can be an effective social media advisor, even if you are not personally on Facebook yourself. In this post, I’m going to briefly discuss some of the personal reasons why I do not engage on Facebook, and why I’m thinking about withdrawing my participation from social media completely. You can read part 1 here, and part 2 here.

Even if you don’t work in a social media or technology-related field, sometimes keeping up with social media can feel like a second full time job. For some, this second job is worth it, but for others, it might not be, and social media use is more a compulsion, something you do out of habit, even when it stops feeling fun. Like smoking a pack of cigarettes a day, or a regular sugar habit, this activity initially delivers feelings of happiness, euphoria or satisfaction, only to devolve into a monkey on the users’ back.

Continue reading “Why I Don’t Use Facebook: Part 3”

Why I Don’t Use Facebook: Part 3

Why I Don’t Use Facebook: Part 2

This is a follow up to my first post, which details why I think you can be an effective social media advisor, even if you are not personally on Facebook yourself. In this post, I’m going to briefly discuss some of the larger political and economic reasons why I do not engage on Facebook, and why I’m thinking about withdrawing my participation from social media completely, on a personal level that is.

A video camera pointed at a Facebook logo with barbed wire in the background
Facebook Video by Esther Vargas. Retrieved from Flickr: https://flic.kr/p/dC3AV4

Ahhhhh Facebook! The ubiquitous social network that allows us to freely cyber stalk each other, and live our FOMO best lives in the public eye! A platform that allows us to specify our likes and dislikes, to be collected for all to see! An online bazaar where marketers take all the information we have freely given and use it to sell us more stuff! Facebook how did we ever live without you?

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Why I Don’t Use Facebook: Part 2

Why I Don’t Use Facebook Part 1

I am a social media researcher, lecturer, and consultant. Invariably whenever I speak with someone about social media, the conversation turns from the theoretical and abstract (best practices for getting your posts noticed; or the effect of social media on democratic participation in society) to the mundane and personal. When this happens, we usually start talking about what social media accounts we use ourselves, or, innocently enough, someone will ask me to connect with them on their social media accounts – first among them, of course, being the eponymous Facebook. When this conversation occurs, I attempt to casually mention that I no longer have a Facebook account, and it is there that my friends, colleagues, students, peers in the industry look at me as if I have suddenly grown a second head.

“Whaaaaaaat? You’re a social media expert (their words, not mine) and you are not on Facebook?”

or

“How can you not be on Facebook? You STUDY social media”

Continue reading “Why I Don’t Use Facebook Part 1”

Why I Don’t Use Facebook Part 1

Access Denied? Public Scholarship and the peril of being a woman

Social media and web 2.0 have presented exciting new possibilities for sharing research with the world. While our research in the academy is often confined to discipline specific conferences and academic journals, stuck behind paywalls and accessible only to others in the academic community, self publishing our work on blogs, twitter, facebook, or other platforms allows researchers to communicate their work to a broad audience.

This trend is exciting. As you can see on this blog, I can, with no intermediary, share in plain language, why I think my research is important. People can access my work from around the world, and we can engage in debate or take research in new directions. Furthermore, it’s in the interests of society as a whole. As an academic, my work is at least in part funded by tax dollars. Thus it can be argued that I have an obligation to make my work available and accessible to the public who helps to fund my work.

With these social and scholarly benefits, it’s no wonder that many are advocating that all academics turn to social media platforms to share their research. Unfortunately, however, the question of whether or not to discuss your work in public online is neither simple nor straightforward for many women and people from marginalized populations – particularly those who work in critical gender and race studies, game studies and STEM.

Continue reading “Access Denied? Public Scholarship and the peril of being a woman”

Access Denied? Public Scholarship and the peril of being a woman